Statutory Holidays in Canada 2023: Federal and Provincial Stat Holidays

Statutory Holidays in Canada: In Canada, there are 12 federal statutory holidays in a year, and they are observed across all provinces and territories. The federal government establishes and applies these holidays to employees in federally regulated industries and organizations.

Here are the 12 federal statutory holidays in Canada in 2023:

Date Holiday
January 2 New Year’s Day (observed)
February 20 Family Day
April 14 Good Friday
May 22 Victoria Day
June 26 National Indigenous Peoples Day
July 1 Canada Day
August 7 Civic Holiday
September 4 Labour Day
October 9 Thanksgiving Day
November 11 Remembrance Day
December 25 Christmas Day
December 26 Boxing Day

It is important to note that some provinces and territories have additional statutory holidays not observed federally. For example, in Ontario, the first Monday in August is celebrated as Simcoe Day, while in Quebec, June 24 is celebrated as Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day.

Federal statutory holidays apply to employees who work in federally regulated industries such as banking, telecommunications, and interprovincial transportation. However, most employees who work in provincial and territorial industries also observe these holidays. It is important to check with your employer to see if you are entitled to these holidays and if you will be paid for them.

In addition to the 12 federal statutory holidays, some employers may offer additional paid holidays or allow employees to take personal days off. Reviewing your employment contract or speaking with your employer to understand your entitlements is important.

Provincial Statutory Holidays 2023

Here are the provincial statutory holidays in Canada for 2023:

Alberta

In Alberta, there are nine statutory holidays observed by most employers. The dates are:

Date Holiday
January 2 New Year’s Day (observed)
February 20 Family Day
April 14 Good Friday
May 22 Victoria Day
July 3 Canada Day (observed)
August 7 Heritage Day
September 4 Labour Day
October 9 Thanksgiving Day
November 13 Remembrance Day (observed)
December 25 Christmas Day

British Columbia

In British Columbia, there are ten statutory holidays observed by most employers. The dates are:

Date Holiday
January 2 New Year’s Day (observed)
February 13 Family Day
April 14 Good Friday
May 22 Victoria Day
July 3 Canada Day (observed)
August 7 British Columbia Day
September 4 Labour Day
October 9 Thanksgiving Day
November 11 Remembrance Day
December 25 Christmas Day

Manitoba

In Manitoba, there are nine statutory holidays observed by most employers. The dates are:

Date Holiday
January 2 New Year’s Day (observed)
February 20 Louis Riel Day
April 14 Good Friday
May 22 Victoria Day
July 3 Canada Day (observed)
August 7 Terry Fox Day
September 4 Labour Day
October 9 Thanksgiving Day
November 11 Remembrance Day
December 25 Christmas Day

New Brunswick

In New Brunswick, there are nine statutory holidays observed by most employers. The dates are:

Date Holiday
January 2 New Year’s Day (observed)
February 20 Family Day
April 14 Good Friday
May 22 Victoria Day
July 3 Canada Day (observed)
August 7 New Brunswick Day
September 4 Labour Day
October 9 Thanksgiving Day
November 11 Remembrance Day
December 25 Christmas Day

Newfoundland and Labrador

In Newfoundland and Labrador, there are ten statutory holidays observed by most employers. The dates are:

Date Holiday
January 2 New Year’s Day (observed)
February 20 Islander Day
April 14 Good Friday
May 22 Victoria Day
July 3 Memorial Day
August 7 Civic Holiday
September 4 Labour Day
October 9 Thanksgiving Day
November 11 Remembrance Day
December 25 Christmas Day

Nova Scotia

In Nova Scotia, there are nine statutory holidays observed by most employers. The dates are:

Date Holiday
January 2 New Year’s Day (observed)
February 20 Heritage Day
April 14 Good Friday
May 22 Victoria Day
July 3 Canada Day (observed)
August 7 Natal Day
September 4 Labour Day
October 9 Thanksgiving Day
November 11 Remembrance Day

Ontario

In Ontario, there are nine statutory holidays observed by most employers. The dates are:

Date Holiday
January 2 New Year’s Day (observed)
February 20 Family Day
April 14 Good Friday
May 22 Victoria Day
July 3 Canada Day (observed)
August 7 Civic Holiday
September 4 Labour Day
October 9 Thanksgiving Day
November 11 Remembrance Day (observed)
December 25 Christmas Day

Prince Edward Island

In Prince Edward Island, there are nine statutory holidays observed by most employers. The dates are:

Date Holiday
January 2 New Year’s Day (observed)
February 20 Islander Day
April 14 Good Friday
May 22 Victoria Day
July 3 Canada Day (observed)
August 7 Natal Day
September 4 Labour Day
October 9 Thanksgiving Day
November 13 Remembrance Day (obs

Understanding Statutory Holidays

Statutory holidays are designated days recognized by the Canadian government, where employees are entitled to a day off with pay. These days are observed nationwide, and federal and provincial governments set dates.

In 2023, there will be nine statutory holidays in Canada. Five are federal holidays, and the remaining four are provincial holidays. All provinces and territories observe federal holidays, while provincial holidays are observed only in the provinces where they are designated.

It is important to note that not all employees are entitled to statutory holiday pay. Employees entitled to this pay have worked for their employer for at least 30 days and have worked their scheduled shifts before and after the holiday.

If an employee is required to work on a statutory holiday, they are entitled to either regular pay plus time-and-a-half for hours worked or regular pay plus a day off with pay at a later date.

Here are the federal statutory holidays in Canada for 2023:

Date Holiday
January 2 New Year’s Day (observed)
April 14 Good Friday
May 22 Victoria Day
July 1 Canada Day
December 25 Christmas Day

Here are the provincial statutory holidays in Canada for 2023:

Province Date Holiday
Alberta August 7 Heritage Day
British Columbia August 7 British Columbia Day
Manitoba July 3 Manitoba Day
New Brunswick August 7 New Brunswick Day
Newfoundland and Labrador July 17 Memorial Day
Northwest Territories June 21 National Indigenous Peoples Day
Nova Scotia August 7 Natal Day
Nunavut July 9 Nunavut Day
Ontario August 7 Civic Holiday
Prince Edward Island August 7 Natal Day
Quebec June 24 Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day
Saskatchewan August 7 Saskatchewan Day

Employers and employees must be aware of statutory holidays and entitlements to avoid confusion and ensure fair treatment.

Employee Rights and Obligations

Employees in Canada have certain rights and obligations regarding statutory holidays. Here are some key points to keep in mind:

  • All employees, regardless of their job status, are entitled to statutory holiday pay if they meet certain criteria. This includes working for the same employer for at least 30 days before the holiday and working their scheduled shift before and after the holiday (unless they have a valid reason for not doing so).
  • Employees who work on a statutory holiday are entitled to either time off in lieu or premium pay. The amount of premium pay varies depending on the province or territory, but it is typically 1.5 times their regular pay rate.
  • Employers are not allowed to require employees to work on a statutory holiday, but employees can choose to work if they want to. However, if they do work, they must be compensated according to the abovementioned rules.
  • If an employee is scheduled to work on a statutory holiday and they do not show up without a valid reason, they may be subject to disciplinary action.
  • Employees with questions or concerns about their rights and obligations regarding statutory holidays should speak to their employer or consult the relevant provincial or territorial labor standards agency.

Employees need to understand their rights and obligations regarding statutory holidays in Canada. By doing so, they can ensure that they are treated fairly and receive appropriate compensation for their work.

Statutory Holidays in Canada

Employer Responsibilities

Employers in Canada have certain responsibilities when it comes to statutory holidays. Here are some key things to keep in mind:

  • Employers must provide their employees with time off on statutory holidays unless the nature of the work requires them to work. In this case, employers must provide employees with an alternative day off or pay them a premium for holiday work.
  • Employers must ensure their employees know their rights and responsibilities concerning statutory holidays. This includes informing employees of the dates of the holidays, the rules around holiday pay, and any other relevant information.
  • Employers must calculate holiday pay correctly. Employees are generally entitled to their average daily wage for the days they normally work during the holiday period. However, there are some exceptions, such as for employees who work on a commission basis or have irregular hours.
  • Employers must be aware of the rules around substitute holidays. In some cases, employees may be entitled to a substitute holiday if a statutory holiday falls on a day when they are not scheduled to work. Employers must ensure that their employees know their rights in this regard.
  • Employers must also know the rules around vacation entitlement and general holidays. Employees are entitled to at least two weeks of vacation per year and nine general holidays. Employers must ensure that they are complying with these requirements.

Overall, employers in Canada have several responsibilities regarding statutory holidays. By being aware of these responsibilities and taking steps to ensure compliance, employers can help ensure that their employees are treated fairly and comply with Canadian labor laws.

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Calculating Statutory Holiday Pay

As per the Canada Labour Code, employees who are required to work on a general holiday are entitled to receive holiday pay plus a rate of at least one and a half times (1.5x) their regular rate of wages for the time worked on that day. The following table shows the general holiday pay entitlements for federally regulated employees:

General Holiday Entitlement
New Year’s Day January 1
Good Friday Friday before Easter Sunday
Canada Day July 1
Labour Day First Monday in September
Christmas Day December 25

If an employee works on a general holiday, they are entitled to receive one and a half times (1.5x) their regular rate of wages for the time worked on that day, in addition to their general holiday pay entitlement. For example, an employee who is paid $20 per hour would receive $30 per hour for hours worked on a general holiday.

It is important to note that general holiday pay is calculated based on the employee’s wages, vacation pay, and any statutory holiday pay earned in the four weeks before the holiday. The following formula can be used to calculate general holiday pay:

General Holiday Pay = (Total Wages + Vacation Pay + Statutory Holiday Pay) รท 20

Where:

  • Total Wages: Employee’s wages earned in the four weeks before the holiday
  • Vacation Pay: Vacation pay earned in the four weeks before the holiday
  • Statutory Holiday Pay: Any statutory holiday pay earned in the four weeks before the holiday

In summary, employees who work on a general holiday are entitled to receive holiday pay plus a rate of at least one and a half times (1.5x) their regular rate of wages for the time worked on that day. General holiday pay is calculated based on the employee’s wages, vacation pay, and any statutory holiday pay earned four weeks before the holiday.

Exceptions and Special Cases

While most employees in Canada are entitled to statutory holidays, there are some exceptions and special cases that employers and employees should be aware of. Here are some of the most common ones:

Part-time and Casual Employees

Part-time and casual employees are entitled to statutory holiday pay as long as they have worked at least 15 of the last 30 days before the holiday and have worked their last scheduled shift before and after the holiday (unless they have a reasonable excuse for not doing so).

Employees on Leave

Employees on leave (such as maternity or parental leave) are still entitled to statutory holiday pay if they have worked for the employer for at least 30 days in the 12 months before the holiday.

Employees on Call

Employees on call during a statutory holiday are entitled to statutory holiday pay if they are required to be available to work and are not free to use the time for their purposes.

Retail Businesses

Retail businesses are exempt from some statutory holidays in certain provinces. For example, in Ontario, retail businesses are exempt from Family Day and Victoria Day but must still give their employees a day off with pay on those holidays.

Construction Industry

In the construction industry, employers can substitute any of the nine statutory holidays with another day off with pay, as long as the employer and most employees agree upon the substitute day.

Employers and employees need to be aware of these exceptions and special cases to ensure compliance with statutory holiday laws. Employers should also review their employment contracts and collective agreements to ensure they provide the correct entitlements to their employees.

Resources and References

Here are some helpful resources and references for learning more about statutory holidays in Canada in 2023:

  • Statutory Holidays in Canada 2023: Federal and Provincial Stat Holiday Guide: A comprehensive guide to statutory holidays in Canada in 2023, including federal and provincial holidays, holiday pay requirements, and more.
  • Public Holidays – Canada.ca: A list of public holidays in Canada in 2023, including New Year’s Day, Good Friday, Easter Monday, Victoria Day, Canada Day, Labour Day, Thanksgiving Day, Remembrance Day, Christmas Day, and Boxing Day.
  • Canadian Statutory Holidays in 2023: A list of statutory holidays in Canada in 2023, including New Year’s Day, Family Day, Good Friday, Easter Monday, Victoria Day, Canada Day, Labour Day, Thanksgiving Day, Remembrance Day, Christmas Day, and Boxing Day.
  • 2023 Canadian Statutory Holidays – TPD: A blog post that lists all the statutory holidays celebrated in Canada in 2023, along with the provinces and territories they’re celebrated in.
  • 2023 Statutory Holidays in Canada – Wagepoint Blog: A blog post that explains how to load all the federal and provincial holidays before processing your first payroll for 2023 in the Company > Company holidays tab in Wagepoint.

These resources can help you plan your time off and ensure you know your rights and obligations as an employee or employer. Remember that statutory holiday requirements can vary by province and territory, so it’s important to check the specific rules that apply to your situation.

Frequently Asked Questions

What are the federal statutory holidays in Canada for 2023?

The federal statutory holidays in Canada for 2023 are New Year’s Day (January 1), Good Friday (April 7), Victoria Day (May 22), Canada Day (July 1), Labour Day (September 4), Thanksgiving Day (October 9), Remembrance Day (November 11), Christmas Day (December 25), and Boxing Day (December 26).

What is the Civic Holiday, and when does it occur in 2023?

The Civic Holiday is a provincial statutory holiday in Canada observed on the first Monday of August. In 2023, the Civic Holiday will occur on August 7 in British Columbia, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and Nunavut. However, it is not a statutory holiday in all provinces and territories.

Is July 3, 2023, a statutory holiday in Canada?

July 3, 2023, is not a statutory holiday in Canada. The next statutory holiday after Canada Day (July 1) in 2023 will be the Civic Holiday on August 7.

What happens if Canada Day falls on a Saturday in 2023?

If Canada Day falls on a Saturday in 2023, then July 2 will be the statutory holiday instead of July 1. However, if Canada Day falls on a Sunday, then July 3 will be the statutory holiday instead of July 1.

Are federal statutory holidays observed in all provinces and territories?

Yes, federal statutory holidays are observed in all provinces and territories in Canada. However, some provinces and territories may have additional statutory holidays specific to their region.

What is the difference between federal and provincial statutory holidays in Canada?

Federal statutory holidays are observed nationwide, while provincial holidays are specific to each province and territory. In addition, federal statutory holidays are established by the federal government, while each province or territory’s government establishes provincial statutory holidays.

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