Pros and Cons of Taking CPP at Age 60 – 2023 Detailed Guide

CPP at Age 60: The Canada Pension Plan (CPP) is a government-run social insurance program designed to provide retirement, disability, and survivor benefits to eligible Canadians. It is a mandatory program, meaning that most Canadians who work and pay taxes contribute to the CPP throughout their working lives.

The CPP is funded by contributions from employers, employees, and self-employed individuals. The amount of CPP contributions you make throughout your working life will determine the amount of CPP benefits you are eligible to receive in retirement.

One of the primary benefits of the CPP is that it provides a stable source of retirement income. This can be especially important for retirees who may not have other sources of income, such as a private pension or significant savings.

However, taking CPP at age 60 has both pros and cons. On the one hand, taking CPP early can provide a much-needed source of income for retirees who may be struggling financially. On the other hand, taking CPP early can result in a reduced benefit amount, which may not be enough to meet your long-term retirement needs.

It is important to consider your financial situation and retirement goals carefully before deciding when to start taking CPP. Consulting with a financial advisor can also help make this decision.

Factors Influencing Decision to Take CPP at Age 60

When deciding whether to take CPP at age 60, several factors must be considered. Here are some of the most important ones:

Financial Situation

One of the main factors to consider is your financial situation. If you need the money to cover your living expenses, taking CPP at age 60 might be a good idea. However, remember that if you take CPP early, your monthly payments will be lower than waiting until you’re older. On the other hand, if you have other sources of income and don’t need the money right away, it might make sense to wait until you’re older to take CPP.

Health Status

Your health status is another important factor to consider. If you have a serious medical condition and don’t expect to live very long, taking CPP at age 60 might be a good idea. However, if you’re in good health and expect to live a long time, waiting until you’re older might make sense to take CPP. Remember that if you take CPP early and live a long time, you might receive less money over your lifetime than if you had waited.

Employment Status

Your employment status is also important to consider. If you’re still working and earning a high income, it might make sense to wait until you’re older to take CPP. If you take CPP early while still working, your CPP payments might be reduced or even eliminated. On the other hand, if you’re not working and don’t expect to earn a high income in retirement, taking CPP at age 60 might be a good idea.

Retirement Goals

Finally, your retirement goals are an important factor to consider. If you want to retire early and enjoy your retirement, taking CPP at age 60 might be a good idea. However, if you want to work longer and save more money for retirement, waiting until you’re older might make sense to take CPP. Remember that if you take CPP early, you might have less money available to achieve your retirement goals.

Overall, the decision to take CPP at age 60 is a complex one that depends on many factors. By considering your financial situation, health status, employment status, and retirement goals, you can make an informed decision that’s right for you.

Advantages of Taking CPP at Age 60

There are several advantages if you are considering taking the CPP at age 60. Here are some of the most significant benefits:

Early Access to Funds

One of the most significant advantages of taking CPP at age 60 is having early access to funds. This can be especially beneficial if you retire early and need the money to support yourself. By taking CPP at age 60, you can start receiving regular payments immediately, which can help you cover your expenses and enjoy your retirement.

Flexibility in Retirement Planning

Another advantage of CPP at age 60 is that it provides more flexibility in your retirement planning. By starting your CPP payments early, you can use the funds to supplement your income and help you achieve your retirement goals. This can be especially useful if you have other retirement savings you want to preserve later in life.

Potential for Long-Term Benefits

Finally, taking CPP at age 60 can provide you with the potential for long-term benefits. While you will receive smaller payments than if you waited until age 65 or 70, you will also receive payments for a longer period. This can help you maximize your overall CPP benefits throughout your retirement.

Taking CPP at age 60 can be a smart financial decision for many retirees. Providing early access to funds, flexibility in retirement planning, and potential for long-term benefits can help you achieve your retirement goals and enjoy your golden years to the fullest.

Disadvantages of Taking CPP at Age 60

CPP at Age 60

Reduced Monthly Benefits

One of the main disadvantages of taking CPP at age 60 is that your monthly benefits will be reduced. The standard age for CPP retirement benefits is 65, and if you choose to take your CPP early, you will receive a reduced amount. The reduction is calculated as a percentage of the standard CPP retirement pension, currently at 36% for 2023. If you choose to take your CPP at age 60, you will receive a monthly pension 36% less than what you would receive if you waited until age 65.

Impact on Other Government Benefits

Another disadvantage of CPP at age 60 is that it may impact your eligibility for other government benefits. For example, taking CPP early may reduce your GIS payments if you receive the Guaranteed Income Supplement (GIS). This is because GIS payments are based on your income, and taking CPP early will increase your income. Additionally, if you are receiving other means-tested government benefits, taking CPP early may impact your eligibility for those benefits.

Inflation Considerations

When deciding whether to take CPP at age 60, it is important to consider the impact of inflation. CPP benefits are adjusted for inflation each year, but the adjustment amount may not keep pace with the actual inflation rate. This means that the purchasing power of your CPP benefits may decrease over time. If you take CPP early, you will receive a lower monthly benefit, which may be more susceptible to the impact of inflation.

While taking CPP at age 60 may be an attractive option for some individuals, it is important to consider the potential disadvantages carefully. Taking CPP early will result in a reduced monthly benefit, impact your eligibility for other government benefits, and make you more susceptible to inflation.

Analyzing the Break-Even Point

One of the key factors to consider when deciding whether to take CPP at age 60 or to defer it is the break-even point. This is when the total amount of CPP received by taking it early equals the total amount received later.

The break-even point is affected by several factors, including life expectancy, the amount of CPP benefits received, and the age at which benefits are first received. For example, taking CPP at age 60 will receive a lower monthly benefit than waiting until age 65. However, you will receive benefits for five additional years, which may offset the lower monthly amount.

According to BlueShore Financial, the break-even age if you begin benefits at age 60 instead of 65 is approximately 74. If your family history, health, and lifestyle suggest you’ll live past age 74, you’re better off waiting until 65 to collect. On the other hand, if you’re 65 and contemplating deferring to age 70, that move only pays off if you live past 82.

It’s important to note that the break-even point is only one factor when deciding whether to take CPP early or late. Other factors, such as your current financial situation, retirement goals, and overall health, should also be considered. For example, if you need cash flow, taking CPP benefits early may be the best option for you.

Analyzing the break-even point is important in deciding whether to take CPP benefits early or late. However, it’s important to consider all factors, including your current financial situation and retirement goals, before deciding.

Impact of Legislation Changes in 2023

In 2023, the Canadian government introduced legislation changes that affect the Canada Pension Plan (CPP). These changes include the enhancement of the CPP retirement pension, the CPP contribution rate, and the maximum pensionable earnings.

The CPP enhancement increases the premiums paid on any given level of earnings, while the maximum pensionable earnings increase hikes the amount of earnings that CPP premiums are paid on. As of 2023, the maximum pensionable earnings are $82,700, up from $61,600 in 2022. This means Canadians earning more than $82,700 will pay more CPP premiums.

The CPP contribution rate also increased from 5.45% to 5.7% in 2023. This means that both employers and employees will pay more CPP premiums. For example, if you earn $60,000 annually, your CPP contribution will increase by $255 per year.

The CPP enhancement will also affect how many CPP benefits Canadians can receive. The enhancement will increase the retirement pension by about 33% for those who contribute the maximum amount to CPP over their working lives. However, this increase will not be immediate. It will be phased in over several years, starting in 2024.

It is important to note that the CPP enhancement will not affect the CPP disability or survivor benefits. These benefits will remain the same.

Overall, the 2023 CPP legislation changes will positively and negatively impact Canadians. While the CPP enhancement will provide higher retirement benefits for those who contribute the maximum amount, the increased CPP contribution rate and maximum pensionable earnings will result in higher CPP premiums for employers and employees.

Personalized Retirement Strategies

When deciding when to start receiving your CPP benefits, there is no one-size-fits-all answer. The best strategy for you will depend on various factors, including your current financial situation, your expected retirement expenses, and your health and life expectancy.

Here are a few personalized retirement strategies to consider:

Take CPP early if you need the income

If you have retired and need an extra source of income to cover your living expenses, taking CPP at age 60 may be a good choice. While you will receive a smaller monthly benefit than if you wait until age 65 or later, you will receive more payments overall.

Delay CPP if you have other sources of income.

If you have other sources of retirement income, such as a pension or RRSP, you may be able to delay taking CPP until age 65 or later. This will result in a larger monthly benefit, which can help supplement your other income sources.

Consider your health and life expectancy.

If you believe you may not live past your mid-70s, taking CPP early may be a good choice. On the other hand, if you have a family history of longevity and expect to live well into your 80s or beyond, delaying CPP may be a better strategy.

Consult a financial advisor.

If you are unsure about the best retirement strategy for your situation, it may be wise to consult a financial advisor. They can help you assess your financial situation, evaluate your retirement goals, and create a personalized strategy that works for you.

Remember, there is no one right answer regarding CPP and retirement planning. It’s important to consider your circumstances and decide what works best for you.

Also Read: Multiple TFSA Accounts

Frequently Asked Questions

How much can you earn while collecting CPP?

If you are collecting CPP and still working, you can earn up to a certain limit without reducing your CPP benefits. In 2023, the limit is $20,000. Any earnings above this limit will result in a reduction in your CPP benefits.

When is it best to take CPP?

The decision to take CPP depends on your circumstances. If you need the money to cover your expenses, taking CPP at 60 may be the best option. However, if you can afford to wait, delaying CPP until age 70 can result in a higher monthly benefit.

Maximum CPP benefit 2023?

The maximum CPP benefit in 2023 is $1,203.75 per month. This amount is based on the maximum CPP contributions and the years you have contributed to the CPP.

Maximum CPP at age 63?

If you take CPP at age 63, your monthly benefit will be reduced by approximately 20% compared to at age 65. The maximum CPP benefit at age 63 in 2023 is $961.00 monthly.

How much can I earn while on CPP disability in 2023?

If you are receiving CPP disability benefits, you can earn up to $6,600 per year without any reduction in your benefits. Any earnings above this limit will result in a reduction in your CPP disability benefits.

Is it worth taking CPP at 60?

Whether it is worth taking CPP at 60 depends on your circumstances. If you need the money to cover your expenses, taking CPP at 60 may be the best option. However, if you can afford to wait, delaying CPP until age 70 can result in a higher monthly benefit. Remember that if you delay taking CPP, you will receive a smaller number of payments overall.

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